Tin Cup reaps the benefits of Marchio fast pitch experience and tradition

Written by Bob on June 3rd, 2015
2015 Tin Cup Restaurant and Bar. Front row left, Dave Reiter, Tyler Bouley, Miguel Hernandez, Joe Newton, Sam Nieman, Chris Diethart. Back row left,  Dave Marchio, Joel Cooley, Zack Lopez, Shawn Gibbons, Alex Killa, Dominic Marchio. Courtesy Photo / Valerie Quigley Bouley

2015 Tin Cup Restaurant and Bar. Front row left, Dave Reiter, Tyler Bouley, Miguel Hernandez, Joe Newton, Sam Nieman, Chris Diethart. Back row left,
Dave Marchio, Joel Cooley, Zack Lopez, Shawn Gibbons, Alex Killa, Dominic Marchio. Courtesy Photo / Valerie Quigley Bouley

Dave Marchio, back row far left, and son Dominic Marchio, back row far right, continue three generations of Marchio’s playing fastpitch softball.

ST. PAUL, Minn. – In 2013 the Tin Cup men’s fastpitch team was formed. The team was young and promising, but lacking in experience. Tin Cup needed someone to take the reins that knew the game, had played the game.

Dave Marchio was the right man for the job.

With 35 years experience playing with and against some of Minnesota’s best clubs – the likes of Jeraldine’s Bar, All-American Bar, the St. Paul Merchants, Scandia and Stillwater – Marchio had the know-how to lead Tin Cup with its roster skewed heavily with 19-year-olds.

    DAD’S EXPERIENCE INVALUABLE

Dominic Marchio was one of those 19-year-olds that came under the tutelage of his father. He and his young teammates quickly realized they had a lot to learn about playing the game.

And the senior Marchio was the voice of experience Tin Cup needed.

“His experience, it goes a long way,” said Dominic. “He leads in a positive way and it feels comforting to have someone reassure you of your skills on the ball field if you make a bad play.”

    VETERAN HITTER

But leadership wasn’t the only asset Marchio brought to Tin Cup. For a 51-year-old, he still swings the bat pretty well.

Need proof?

Well, just last weekend in the 12th Annual Dugout Memorial Tournament that Tin Cup won, Marchio roughed up some pretty good pitchers.

In a 2-1 win over Ostrander Fastpitch, Marchio drove in the winning run. He followed that up by battering the Rice Lake (Wisc.) Orangemen for six RBI, highlighted with a bases-clearing double in a 7-3 win.

“It was one of my better tournaments,” said Dave Marchio, crediting some of his success to dropping weight. “Losing 40 pounds, I feel like I’m 30 years old again.”

But a closer look at his past prowess finds that weight doesn’t seem to have much to do with his success. The man can hit a softball.

    EXCELS AT NAFA WORLD SERIES

Last August in Tin Cup’s fifth-place finish in the NAFA World Series AA-Division, he had a huge tournament. He led the team with six RBI, along with a third-best team batting average of .450 (9-for-20); and he only struck out once.

And 12 years a go he managed and played for Jeraldine’s Bar of St. Paul, helping the team win the 2003 NAFA A Division World Series. He was selected All-World for his .444 average, eight runs and eight RBI, including three doubles, a triple and two home runs.

But Marchio puts his own success in the back seat, instead focusing on what he can do to help his young team return even stronger to the NAFA World Series; to play in the ISC World Tournament; to compete well in the upcoming Holm Classic in Fargo; and to also claim titles in a few of Minnesota’s top tournaments.

Tin Cup has started the season perfect at 9-0, which has earned the praise from competing teams.

“I get a lot of compliments from other teams when they hear how young they are,” Marchio said.

    THREE FASTPITCH GENERANTIONS

There’s a lot on Marchio’s plate this season, but he doesn’t mind. The man loves fastpitch. It’s a passion going back three generations, starting with his father, Frank, who passed away in 2007.

“My dad played in the Yankees and Dodgers’ organizations,” said Marchio. “After his baseball career was over, he played fastpitch into the late 1960s. I never got to see him play baseball, but I have a fantastic scrapbook of his playing days.”

His dad’s fastpitch career inspired all three Marchio boys – including Dave’s brothers Frank, Jr. and Stan – to take up the sport.

“My older brothers dragged me along to their league and tournament games,” Marchio said with a chuckle, “and I got hooked.”

    THE TEACHER

And now Dominic is hooked. As a former baseball player, he has made the adjustment to fastpitch quite well.

In the Dugout tournament, he drove in two runs in a 3-0 win over Bon Ton and played well in the field. But when things aren’t going so well, it’s comforting to know he can turn to his dad for advice.

“He’s taught me a lot about the game,” Dominic said. “He keeps teaching me and helping make me into the player I’m going to be.”

    SPECIAL NUMBER

Though his brothers have since retired, Marchio and his son continue to carry on the family’s fastpitch tradition. A tradition that also includes a very special number that Dominic wears proudly.

“My dad and I were talking about possible (uniform) numbers,” said Dominic, “and he mentioned 15 in honor of my grandpa. I said, ‘OK’ and embraced it. It’s cool because my uncle Stan also wore number 15 back in his day when he played.”

It’s a number that hopefully future generations of Marchio’s will proudly wear.

Leave a Comment