Erie men’s fastpitch

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Annual Ed MCormick Tournament in Erie, Pennsylvania set with top-ranked teams entered

Monday, July 27th, 2015

hillhouse.bill.1web Bill Hillhouse, tournament director of the Ed McCormick Invitational, has eight of the world’s top-ranked teams entered and vying for a championship, Aug. 1-2.

ERIE, Penn. – Everyone…

The schedule for Erie will be completed TODAY/TONIGHT. There was the last minute subtraction of one more team leaving the tournament with eight teams – eight of the finest teams in North America: Toronto Gators, NY Gremlins, Circle Tap, Bloomington Stix, Scarb. Force, Peligro Gremlins, Hallman Twins and 2015 ASA National Champions Hill United.

Click to continue reading “Annual Ed MCormick Tournament in Erie, Pennsylvania set with top-ranked teams entered”

Top fastpitch teams coming to Erie

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

hillhouse.bill.1webFastpitch softball pitcher and Ed McCormick Fastpitch Tournament Director Bill Hillhouse. ROB ENGELHARDT//ERIE TIMES-NEWS

FROM STAFF REPORTS, Erie Times-News

ERIE, Penn – Four of the world’s elite fastpitch softball teams will collide July 27-28 in the fourth annual Ed McCormick Fastpitch Tournament, to be played at 11th and Hess.

And while four teams might not seem like a lot, it’s actually twice as many teams as currently exist in Erie’s once-thriving men’s City Rec fastpitch softball league.

That’s a far cry from the 1980s and ’90s, according to Bill Hillhouse, a world-class pitcher who has competed internationally since 1990 and who plays for the New York Gremlins, the world’s No. 1-ranked team and one of the clubs locked and loaded for the McCormick Tournament.

Fastpitch softball, Hillhouse said, used to be the game in town.

So many men wanted to play that the city had a morning league for those who worked third shift.

Now, he said, it’s a struggle to find 18 players to fill out two teams for the City Rec’s informal Tuesday evening fastpitch league.

“People used to go down to the ballpark to watch games on Tuesdays and Thursdays — that was their form of entertainment,” Hillhouse said. “But now they can stay home and watch the Indians on TV every night.

“And it’s just not softball that’s suffering. Drive by any city park and you don’t see kids outside playing. Every sport is suffering. But we don’t have the numbers to make up the difference like the other sports have.” Continue reading